Driven: Lancia Stratos – Nope – Kimera Evo 37

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One look at the Kimera Evo 37 and immediately the old rally scenes are back in the mind’s eye. When Walter Röhrl in 1983 in the rear-wheel drive Lancia 037 at the Rally Monte Carlo hit all four-wheel drive drivers on the head.

But if the Lancia was a purist rally machine, the Kimera Evo 37 presents itself today at least in the interior far more civilian: Dashboard and seats are lined with fine Alcantara. The gearshift lever protrudes from the center console like a mechanical sculpture – and it requires a bit of force.

Kimera Evo 37

The racing clutch also likes a little speed. So rev up, clutch out. And the Kimera sprints forward. The gear ratio seems a bit short.

Display

After just a few meters, the sports car demands second gear. The shift pause is short – but impressive: Because the supercharger now enters the impressive soundscape with a tremendous hiss.

But there’s no time for a moment of shock. The first corner is looming. The Kimera Evo 37 turns in surprisingly nimbly. Then the next, tighter bend. The internally ventilated brake discs, with a diameter of 365 millimeters at the front and rear, the red-painted Brembo fixed calipers in combination with the wide Pirelli rollers have no trouble catching the two-seater weighing just 1000 kilograms.

The Kimera shows its real talent in the following bends. A true curve artist. Light-footed, it dives from one bend into the next. The handling is amazing. That’s how nimble a well-balanced rally car has to be. Here, on the small race track near Cuneo and on the narrow mountain roads before Monte Viso, the Kimera has learned to run.

Kimera Evo 37 It’s

no wonder that one of its teachers is ex-world rally champion Miki Biasion. And Luca Betti, the man behind the Kimera Evo 37 project, is also a specialist. He imbibed the passion for Lancia from an early age: his father drove rallies in the Lancia Stratos.

And his son continued the tradition, spending 15 years as a professional rally driver for various brands. “My life is an evolution,” explains the young entrepreneur. “From being a rally pro, I moved into motorsport management, started my own team. Then I rebuilt my company and restored classic cars. Finally, I started my Kimera project.”

The logo that adorns his car is a chimera, a mythical creature from Greek myth, a lion with wings. Betti uses the figure and modified the name. Chimera became Kimera. In his professional journey, he sees the Kimera Evo 37 as a logical progression. Betti explains, “Even Enzo Ferrari, when he started his own car production, had started with an evolution of an Alfa Romeo.” For him, his Kimera is the modern interpretation of Lancia’s successful history, “Lancia is a brand of our region, a brand that all Italy could be proud of.”

Kimera Evo 37

In 1969, the Agnelli family had incorporated Lancia into the Fiat empire. In 2014, Fiat boss Sergio Marchionne declared that the traditional Italian brand should be discontinued. In fact, it is currently only present in Italy. But with the merger of PSA and FCA last year, CEO Carlos Tavares announced that they wanted to invest in Lancia again.

en.

Betti made this move long ago, because “Lancia is a part of our lives.” His Kimera “is independent, not so digital. And it’s more uncompromising than other supercars. Not a classic car, but a mix of old and new.”

It’s an evolution, a restomod, with elements of the Rally 037 and the Delta S4. “We brought the beautiful looks of the 037 and the powertrain of the S4 together in one car,” Betti says. As with the 037, the base, the passenger compartment, is derived from the old Lancia Beta Montecarlo. The front axle with the radiators and the drivetrain with the rear axle sit in a solid tubular composite made of ultra-modern steel.

Kimera Evo 37

The four-cylinder engine was further developed by Claudio Lombardi, who already built the rally engines, on the basis of the S4 powerplant. The 2.2-liter four-cylinder is turbocharged by a Volumex compressor and a turbocharger.

Previously, the production 037 had to make do with 205 hp. And the rally performers of yesteryear had to struggle with 350 hp. “Our evolution with modern materials, modern manufacturing methods and state-of-the-art electronics,” Betti explains, not without pride, “now produces 505 hp.” The peak torque of 500 Newton meters is also remarkable, with 400 Nm already available at a moderate 2000 rpm. A veritable torque mountain, which actually provides rich propulsion at all engine speeds.

If desired, the output of the four-cylinder can be reduced to a moderate 400 hp at the push of a button. “And we’re also going to make the engine a little softer and smoother. It still behaves like a nervous baby,” says Betti. The exhaust sound is also likely to be tuned a bit more civilly. However, you can switch back to the full sound via a flap system.

If the engine in its base comes from Lancia, the six-speed transmission comes from the VW kit and was once developed for the Lamborghini Gallardo and the Audi R8. An adjustable traction control system will also be available on request. Some of the features on the first Kimera Evo 37 are not yet up to production standard. For example, the dashboard or the seats; they are to be upholstered a little better in the production car.

The Brembo bems in combination with the Bosch racing ABS pack a punch, and with the flat prototype bucket seats you run the risk that if the two leg belts aren’t really tight, you’ll simply slide away towards the footwell. But the Italian safety equipment supplier Sparco will take care of that.

Just as suppliers play a decisive role in the Betti project: The engine is built by Italtechnica, the chassis by Bonetto and the interior by Medici. The whole project will be completed in an annex to a 16th-century mansion near Cuneo, the Villa Kimera. The imposing building houses 14 guest rooms. Even the Italian king Carlo Emanuele III is said to have stayed here once.

37 Kimera Evo 37s are being built, 24 of which are said to have already been sold at a price of 480,000 euros plus tax. The customers are mostly collectors who already own some cars. But the Kimera will hardly gather dust in museums. Because Betti emphasizes, “These are car-guys. Everyone wants to drive the car.” And there’s another thing that unites the Kimera community, as Betti reveals, “All the cars have women’s names.”

With the

customers, he keeps in close contact. “It’s like a big family by now.” They come from Italy, Switzerland, Germany, France, Ukraine, the U.S., Brazil and one from Japan. At the end of February, the first car was delivered to a Dutchman in St. Moritz. The car with the number one goes by the name Esmeralda.

And looking at the photographer, Betti reveals, “This car was not painted white, but green.” After that, the plan is to produce one car per month. And in the meantime, Betti will think about his next project. After all, he wants to become a real car producer. (we/Bernd Ostmann, cen)(Photos: Autoren-Union Mobilität/Wolfgang Wilhelm)

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Data Kimera Evo 37

Length x width x height (m): 4.06 x 1.91 x 1.20
Wheelbase (m): 2.52
Drive: R4 gasoline engine, 2150 cc, rear-wheel drive, 6-speed manual
Total output: 370 kW / 505 hp at 7000 rpm
Max. Torque: 500 Nm
Top speed: >300 km/h
Acceleration 0 to 100 km/h: <3.0 s
Price: 480,000 euros (excl. VAT)

Source

One look at the Kimera Evo 37 and immediately the old rally scenes are back in your mind’s eye. When Walter Röhrl 1983 in the rear-wheel drive Lancia 037 at the Rally Monte Carlo hit all four-wheel drive drivers on the head.

But if the Lancia was a purist rally machine, the Kimera Evo 37 presents itself today at least in the interior far more civilian: Dashboard and seats are lined with fine Alcantara. The gearshift lever protrudes from the center console like a mechanical sculpture – and it requires a bit of force.

Kimera Evo 37

The racing clutch also likes a little speed. So rev up, clutch out. And the Kimera sprints forward. The gear ratio seems a bit short.

Display

After just a few meters, the sports car demands second gear. The shift pause is short – but impressive: Because the supercharger now enters the impressive soundscape with a tremendous hiss.

But there’s no time for a moment of shock. The first corner is looming. The Kimera Evo 37 turns in surprisingly nimbly. Then the next, tighter bend. The internally ventilated brake discs, with a diameter of 365 millimeters at the front and rear, the red-painted Brembo fixed calipers in combination with the wide Pirelli rollers have no trouble catching the two-seater weighing just 1000 kilograms.

The Kimera shows its real talent in the following bends. A true curve artist. Light-footed, it dives from one bend into the next. The handling is amazing. That’s how nimble a well-balanced rally car has to be. Here, on the small race track near Cuneo and on the narrow mountain roads before Monte Viso, the Kimera has learned to run.

Kimera Evo 37 It’s

no wonder that one of its teachers is ex-world rally champion Miki Biasion. And Luca Betti, the man behind the Kimera Evo 37 project, is also a specialist. He imbibed the passion for Lancia from an early age: his father drove rallies in the Lancia Stratos.

And his son continued the tradition, working for 15 years as a professional rally driver for various brands.

v. “My life is an evolution,” explains the young entrepreneur. “From being a professional rally driver, I moved into motorsport management, started my own team. Then I rebuilt my company and restored classic cars. Finally, I started my Kimera project.”

The logo that adorns his car is a chimera, a mythical creature from Greek myth, a lion with wings. Betti uses the figure and modified the name. Chimera became Kimera. In his professional journey, he sees the Kimera Evo 37 as a logical progression. Betti explains, “Even Enzo Ferrari, when he started his own car production, had started with an evolution of an Alfa Romeo.” For him, his Kimera is the modern interpretation of Lancia’s successful history, “Lancia is a brand of our region, a brand that all Italy could be proud of.”

Kimera Evo 37

In 1969, the Agnelli family had incorporated Lancia into the Fiat empire. In 2014, Fiat boss Sergio Marchionne declared that the traditional Italian brand should be discontinued. In fact, it is currently only present in Italy. But with the merger of PSA and FCA last year, CEO Carlos Tavares announced plans to invest in Lancia again.

Betti has long since made this move because “Lancia is a part of our lives.” His Kimera “is independent, not so digital. And it is more uncompromising than other supercars. Not a classic car, but a mix of old and new.”

It’s an evolution, a restomod, with elements of the Rally 037 and the Delta S4. “We brought the beautiful looks of the 037 and the powertrain of the S4 together in one car,” Betti says. As with the 037, the base, the passenger compartment, is derived from the old Lancia Beta Montecarlo. The front axle with the radiators and the drivetrain with the rear axle sit in a solid tubular composite made of ultra-modern steel.

Kimera Evo 37

The four-cylinder engine was further developed by Claudio Lombardi, who already built the rally engines, on the basis of the S4 powerplant. The 2.2-liter four-cylinder is turbocharged by a Volumex compressor and a turbocharger.

Previously, the series-037 had to make do with 205 hp. And the rally performers of yesteryear had to struggle with 350 hp. “Our evolution with modern materials, modern manufacturing methods and state-of-the-art electronics,” Betti explains, not without pride, “now produces 505 hp.” The peak torque of 500 Newton meters is also remarkable, with 400 Nm already available at a moderate 2000 rpm. A veritable torque mountain, which actually provides rich propulsion at all engine speeds.

If desired, the output of the four-cylinder can be reduced to a moderate 400 hp at the push of a button. “And we’re also going to make the engine a little softer and smoother. It still behaves like a nervous baby,” says Betti. The exhaust sound is also likely to be tuned a bit more civilly. However, you can switch back to the full sound via a flap system.

If the engine in its base comes from Lancia, the six-speed transmission comes from the VW kit and was once developed for the Lamborghini Gallardo and the Audi R8. An adjustable traction control system will also be available on request. Some of the features on the first Kimera Evo 37 are not yet up to production standard. For example, the dashboard or the seats; they are to be replaced in the production car.

ook to be padded up a bit better.

The Brembo bems in combination with the Bosch racing ABS pack a punch, and with the flat prototype bucket seats you run the risk of simply slipping away toward the footwell if the two leg straps aren’t really tight. But the Italian safety equipment supplier Sparco will take care of that.

Just as suppliers play a decisive role in the Betti project: The engine is built by Italtechnica, the chassis by Bonetto and the interior by Medici. The whole project will be completed in an annex to a 16th-century mansion near Cuneo, the Villa Kimera. The imposing building houses 14 guest rooms. Even the Italian king Carlo Emanuele III is said to have stayed here once.

37 Kimera Evo 37s are being built, 24 of which are said to have already been sold at a price of 480,000 euros plus tax. The customers are mostly collectors who already own some cars. But the Kimera will hardly gather dust in museums. Because Betti emphasizes, “These are car-guys. Everyone wants to drive the car.” And there’s another thing that unites the Kimera community, as Betti reveals, “All the cars have women’s names.”

He keeps in close contact with the customers. “It’s like a big family by now.” They come from Italy, Switzerland, Germany, France, Ukraine, the U.S., Brazil and one from Japan. At the end of February, the first car was delivered to a Dutchman in St. Moritz. The car with the number one goes by the name Esmeralda.

And looking at the photographer, Betti reveals, “This car was not painted white, but green.” After that, the plan is to produce one car per month. And in the meantime, Betti will think about his next project. After all, he wants to become a real car producer. (we/Bernd Ostmann, cen)(Photos: Autoren-Union Mobilität/Wolfgang Wilhelm)

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Specifications Kimera Evo 37

Length x width x height (m): 4.06 x 1.91 x 1.20
Wheelbase (m): 2.52
Drive: R4 gasoline engine, 2150 cc, rear-wheel drive, 6-speed manual
Total output: 370 kW / 505 hp at 7000 rpm
Max. Torque: 500 Nm
Top speed: >300 km/h
Acceleration 0 to 100 km/h: <3.0 s
Price: 480,000 euros (excl. VAT)


Continue reading: https://www.autodino.de/autonews/2022/04/06/driven-lancia-stratos-nope-kimera-evo-37/

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